Sunday, September 13, 2009

Lost cities by continent

Pacific Ocean

  • Hawaiki, The mythical land to which some Polynesian cultures trace their origins. It may also refer to an underworld in many Māori stories.



[edit] Far East Asia

Southeast Asia

South Asia

Central Asia

Western Asia/Middle East

South America

Inca cities


North America

Mexico and Central America

Maya cities

incomplete list – for further information, see Maya civilization

  • Chichen Itza – This ancient place of pilgrimage is still the most visited Maya ruin.
  • Copán – In modern Honduras.
  • Calakmul – One of two "superpowers" in the classic Maya period.
  • Coba
  • Naachtun – Rediscovered in 1922, it remains one of the most remote and least visited Maya sites. Located 44 km (27 miles) south-south-east of Calakmul, and 65 km (40 miles) north of Tikal, it is believed to have had strategic importance to, and been vulnerable to military attacks by, both neighbours. Its ancient name was identified in the mid-1990s as Masuul.
  • Palenque — in the Mexican state of Chiapas, known for its beautiful art and architecture
  • Tikal — One of two "superpowers" in the classic Maya period.

Aztec Cities

Olmec cities

  • Izapa – Chief city of the Izapa civilization, whose territory extended from the Gulf Coast across to the Pacific Coast of Chiapas, in present day Mexico, and Guatemala.
  • Guayabo – It is believed that the site was inhabited from 1500 BCE (BC) to 1400 CE (AD), and had at its peak a population of around 10.000.

United States


  • L'Anse aux Meadows – Viking settlement founded around 1000.
  • Lost Villages - The Lost Villages are ten communities in the Canadian province of Ontario, in the former townships of Cornwall and Osnabruck (now South Stormont) near Cornwall, which were permanently submerged by the creation of the St. Lawrence Seaway in 1958.

Aultsville - Dickinson's Landing - Farran's Point - Maple Grove - Mille Roches - Moulinette - Santa Cruz - Sheek's Island - Wales - Woodlands



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